Infamous Art Contests
Italiens (and Not)

museumstudies:

RT @despos - Steve Jobs: “Stay hungry, stay foolish”. Silvio Berlusconi: “forza gnocca”. Got the point?

Yeah, got it. Not-Mamzers vs. Mamzers = 1 : 0

…And who the f*ck is Brunetta, anyway???

jenlindblad:

Bologna, Italy, 2 August 1980. Eighty-five people are killed in a terrorist bombing at the Central Station, a massacre that still constitutes one of the darkest chapters in recent Italian history, not least due to ongoing suspicions regarding the involvement of Italy’s secret service. As many other unsolved cases from the same period, in terms of public awareness the Bologna bloodbath stands as a negative milestone: one that is still to be built. Thirty years later, the Italian artist Francesco Arena created his own memorial to this strange gap in the collective consciousness, turning that lack of historical acknowledgment into a sculptural starting point. Arena’s Untitled (Bologna) (2011) is a marble panel on which the 85 names of the victims were repeatedly inscribed until only holes in the stone were left, silhouetting the area where the names once were. Arena’s work is part of a wider interest that an emerging generation of Italian artists has recently been developing in national history, collective traumas and individual amnesias. Whether this means the evolution of a New Realism is beside the point; what is interesting is that artists such as Arena, Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Rossella Biscotti, Gianluca and Massimiliano De Serio, Patrizio Di Massimo and Matteo Rubbi are responding to a question that has been cropping up for more than a decade: why is Italian art is lacking in political engagement? If previous generations of artists were mostly concerned with a hyper-subjective vision of reality, and produced images that seemed to portray a psychic and moral disconnection between the artist and society, young Italian artists today are ready to get their hands dirty, confronting repressed memories of colonialism, Fascism and terrorism – and the contradictions inherent in our current social landscape.
- Alessandro Rabottini
(via Frieze Magazine | Archive | State of a Nation)

Aesthetics, politic, and ethics - a strong, often overlooked connection…

jenlindblad:

Bologna, Italy, 2 August 1980. Eighty-five people are killed in a terrorist bombing at the Central Station, a massacre that still constitutes one of the darkest chapters in recent Italian history, not least due to ongoing suspicions regarding the involvement of Italy’s secret service. As many other unsolved cases from the same period, in terms of public awareness the Bologna bloodbath stands as a negative milestone: one that is still to be built. Thirty years later, the Italian artist Francesco Arena created his own memorial to this strange gap in the collective consciousness, turning that lack of historical acknowledgment into a sculptural starting point. Arena’s Untitled (Bologna) (2011) is a marble panel on which the 85 names of the victims were repeatedly inscribed until only holes in the stone were left, silhouetting the area where the names once were. Arena’s work is part of a wider interest that an emerging generation of Italian artists has recently been developing in national history, collective traumas and individual amnesias. Whether this means the evolution of a New Realism is beside the point; what is interesting is that artists such as Arena, Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Rossella Biscotti, Gianluca and Massimiliano De Serio, Patrizio Di Massimo and Matteo Rubbi are responding to a question that has been cropping up for more than a decade: why is Italian art is lacking in political engagement? If previous generations of artists were mostly concerned with a hyper-subjective vision of reality, and produced images that seemed to portray a psychic and moral disconnection between the artist and society, young Italian artists today are ready to get their hands dirty, confronting repressed memories of colonialism, Fascism and terrorism – and the contradictions inherent in our current social landscape.

Alessandro Rabottini

(via Frieze Magazine | Archive | State of a Nation)

Aesthetics, politic, and ethics - a strong, often overlooked connection…